New Frontiers in Memory Studies Lecture Series: John Sutton

John Sutton (Durham University)

Memory and Distributed Cognition: Inhabiting the Past Together – Notes on Place, Memory, and Re-enactment

Tuesday 30 November 6:15 pm | online via Zoom –> register here

Place and memory are deeply entangled. Their connections are studied in many disparate fields, which are often difficult to move between. After outlining a broadly ‘cognitive-ecological’ framework for understanding ‘place memory’ across distinctive contexts, this talk tries to open some pathways between distinct disciplinary sectors by sketching ideas on two related topics. First, how are the sciences of spatial cognition addressing deep embodied familiarity with places, with specific landscapes or cityscapes or taskscapes, as opposed to the navigation of new or artificial environments? Second, zooming in on social aspects of place memory, what differences does it make when people can collaborate in finding ways to inhabit old or new places together? Here, with reference to historical and contemporary examples from literature, architecture, and performance, I discuss some emotional and political challenges of dealing with historically difficult heritage, and some creative collaborative ways of doing so.

John Sutton‘s research addresses memory, skill, and cognitive history. He is author of Philosophy and Memory Traces: Descartes to Connectionism. His most recent co-edited volume, with Kath Bicknell, is Collaborative Embodied Performance: Ecologies of Skill, which will be published by Bloomsbury in January. Sutton is currently spending a term as Visiting Fellow at Durham University’s Institute of Advanced Study working on their interdisciplinary project Representing Memory.

New Frontiers in Memory Studies is a lecture series by the Frankfurt Memory Studies Platform.

Posted by Moving Cultures-Team in Events, General

NELK Research Colloquium Guest Lecture: Johannes Riquet

Johannes Riquet (Tampere)

Circumpolar Planetarities and Transcultural Geographies in Contemporary Arctic Cinema

Thursday, Nov 4, 2021 6-8 pm, c.t. CET | ZOOM

This talk examines how Arctic landscapes mediate migrant and refugee experiences in recent filmic mediations of the high north, focusing on Nigerian-American Chinonye Chukwu’s alaskaLand (2012), Inuk filmmaker Lucy Tulugarjuk’s Tia and Piujuq (2018), and the Filipino film Nuuk (Veronica Velasco, 2019). Discussing the affective bonds between the young protagonists and the landscape, I draw on Adriana Craciun’s suggestion that “[t]he circumpolar Arctic […] is central to any planetary consciousness” to explore how these films poeticise geography in their construction of the Arctic as a relational space. Bringing into dialogue different concepts of space form the films’ various cultural contexts, I argue that each of them creates transcultural geographies that not only allow us to rethink the Arctic as a space of planetary entanglement, but also offer ways of pluralising and decolonising spatial thought.

Johannes Riquet is Professor of English Literature at Tampere University. He is the author of The Aesthetics of Island Space: Perception, Ideology, Geopoetics (OUP, 2019) and the co-editor of Spatial Modernities: Geography, Narrative, Imaginaries (Routledge, 2018). His research interests include spatiality, the links between literature and geography, travel writing, diaspora, and mobility. He is the Principal Investigator of the collaborative project Mediated Arctic Geographies (Academy of Finland, 2019-2023) and directs the research group Spatial Studies and Environmental Humanities at Tampere University.

Posted by Moving Cultures-Team in General

NELK Research Colloquium: Flora Veit-Wild

Flora Veit-Wild – A Reading and Conversation

Thursday, Oct 21, 2021 | 6-8 pm, c.t. Hybrid event | Room IG 4.201 | ZOOM

Flora Veit-Wild reads from her recently published memoir They Called You Dambudzo

Moderated by Dr. Magdalena Pfalzgraf

They Called You Dambudzo is a memoir with a ‘double heartbeat’. At its centre is the author’s relationship with the late Zimbabwean writer, Dambudzo Marechera, whose award-winning book The House of Hunger marked him as a powerful, disruptive, perhaps prophetic voice in African literature. Flora Veit-Wild is internationally recognised for her significant contribution to preserving Marechera’s legacy. What is less known about Marechera and Veit-Wild is that they had an intense, personal and sexual relationship. This memoir explores this: the couple’s first encounter in 1983, amidst the euphoria of the newly independent Zimbabwe; the tumultuous months when the homeless writer moved in with his lover and her family; the bouts of creativity once he had his own flat followed by feelings of abandonment; the increasing despair about a love affair that could not stand up against reality and the illness of the writer and his death of HIV related pneumonia in August 1987. What follows are the struggles Flora went through once Dambudzo had died. On the one hand she became the custodian of his life and work, on the other she had to live with her own HIV infection and the ensuing threats to her health.

Flora Veit-Wild is Emerita Professor of African literatures at Humboldt University, Berlin. She lived in Harare/Zimbabwe from 1983 to 1993 and became known for her work on Zimbabwean literature and as literary executor and biographer of Dambudzo Marechera and a founder member of the Zimbabwe Women Writers. Her numerous publications include studies of body, madness, sexuality and gender in Anglophone and Francophone African writing as well as code-switching and linguistic innovation in Shona literature. Her memoir They Called You Dambudzo is her first book-length literary work.

More information on Flora Veit-Wild: https://www.floraveitwild.de/

Find NELK on Facebook: www.facebook.com/groups/NELKFrankfurt/

If you have questions or concerns regarding this event, please get in touch with Michelle Stork (m.stork@em.uni-frankfurt.de).

Posted by Moving Cultures-Team in Events, General

A Touch of the Divine: A Conversation with Yann Martel

In Transit|ion – Frankfurt Lectures in Literary and Cultural Studies

A Touch of the Divine:
A Conversation with Yann Martel

Moderator: Pavan Malreddy

Thursday 15 July 2021 | 17-18:30 hrs. CET | via ZOOM | Register at pavanmalreddy@protonmail.com

Yann Martel is a world-renowned writer, with a readership in over forty languages. He has authored four novels, a short story collection and a book of letters to the Prime Minister of Canada. His acclaimed novel Life of Pi (2001) – the most popular winner of the Booker ever – was a universal bestseller, and was adapted to the screen by Oscar-winning director Ang Lee. Given the prominence of animals, anthropomorphism, and comparative religions in his work, critics have variedly dubbed him a postsecularist, posthumanist, magic realist and a maverick of form. A classicist in style, a lyricist in prose, an Avant-gardist in spirit, Yann Martel deals with themes and motifs as expansive as God, art, adventures, migration, and taxidermy. This conversation will be based on his previous as well as ongoing writing projects.

“In Transit|ion – Frankfurt Lectures in Literary and Cultural Studies” is a prestigious lecture series organized by the Institute of English and American Studies at Goethe-Universität Frankfurt. Twice a semester, leading scholars and writers from around the world present their work in the fields of American Studies, English Studies, and Anglophone Literatures and Cultures.

In cooperation with Graduatenkolleg Configurations of Film.

Posted by Moving Cultures-Team in Events

NELK Research Colloquium Guest Lecture: Chandani Lokuge

Chandani Lokuge (Australian National University)

The Right to Belong: Literary Activism and Australian Citizenship Politics

Tuesday, July 6, 2021 | 10-12 am, c.t. (CET) 6-8 pm, c.t. (AEST) | ZOOM link

One compelling aspect of the power of literature is that it transforms encompassing public issues into humanist stories, whose emotive and cognitive resonances transcend the limits of political propaganda, leading the reader to a deep level of interrogation, philosophical and political integrity, and ethical enquiry. Foregrounding this theory, this paper will interrogate a developing branch of Australian literature, that we may identify as the literature of the non-citizen or non-citizenship literature.

A former Sri Lankan Commonwealth scholar to Australia, Chandani Lokuge is currently affiliated to The Australian National University, Canberra. Previously, she was Associate Professor in Literary Studies at Monash University, Melbourne. During her tenure at Monash (2001-2020), she was the founding director of the Monash Centre for Postcolonial Writing and of the South Asian Diaspora International Research Network (SADIRN). Among her recent academic publications is Mediating Literary Borders: Asian Australian Writing, co-edited with Janet Wilson (Routledge 2018). Edited with Chris Ringrose, her new book, Creative Lives: Interviews with South Asian Diaspora Writers (Ibidem/Columbia University Press) will be published in July 2021. As Editor of the Oxford Classics Reissues series, Chandani published 7 critical editions of pioneering Indian women’s Anglophone writing. Chandani is an awarded novelist. While her earlier books dealt with Sri Lankan-Australian interactions in migration and diaspora, her most recent novel, My Van Gogh (2019), which is set in Australia and France, interrogates tourism as a panacea for ‘soul- loss’. Chandani’s international research appointments include the Ludwig Hirschfeld- Mack Visiting Chair in Australian Studies, Free University Berlin (DAAD); Le Studium International Research Chair in Creative Writing, Advanced Studies Institute, Loire Valley, France; and guest professorships at Humanities Centre, Harvard University and NELK, Goethe University Frankfurt.

Posted by Moving Cultures-Team in Events, General

New Frontiers in Memory Studies Lecture Series: Tatjana Louis

Tatjana Louis (Los Andes University, Bogotá)

Peace, War, and how we Talk about it: A Discourse Analysis of Colombian History Schoolbooks

Tuesday 13 July | 6pm | online via Zoom | click here to register

Desaprender la guerra – “unlearning” war – is a central demand of peace education in Colombia, which is intended to contribute to socially overcoming the decades-old conflict. An important role is played by history education, which in 2017 was explicitly assigned the task of contributing to peace and reconciliation through historical memory by Law No. 1874. But what discursive offers exist at all to talk about the past in such a way that it contributes to reconciliation and peace? This lecture takes a close look at textbooks for history lessons and examines how war and peace are represented in the texts, how responsibilities are attributed, what social and individual scope for action is shown, and what assignments of meaning are constructed in the narrative.

Posted by Moving Cultures-Team in Events, General

Memory Studies Association Event: Indian Network for Memory Studies Launch Event

Wednesday, June 16, 2021 | 12.30 CEST | 16.00 IST | Online

Participating:

Prof. Bhaskar Ramamurthi, Director, IIT Madras

Prof. Raghunathan Rengaswamy, Dean (Global Engagement), IIT Madras

Mr. Rajendra Prasad Narla, Chief Archivist, Tata Central Archives

Prof. Astrid Erll, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Director, Frankfurt Memory Studies Platform

Dr. Hanna Teichler, Goethe Universität Frankfurt, Co-Director, Frankfurt Memory Studies Platform, Acting President, Memory Studies Association

Dr. Avishek Parui, IIT Madras, Chairperson, Indian Network for Memory Studies

Dr. Merin Simi Raj, IIT Madras, Chairperson, Indian Network for Memory Studies

Click here to register by 10 June 2021.

For queries write to memorystudiesiitm@gmail.com.

Posted by Moving Cultures-Team in Events, General

NELK Research Colloquium Guest Lecture: Sourit Bhattacharya

Sourit Bhattacharya (Glasgow)

Operation Genocide: Civil War and Postcolonial Literature

Thursday, June 10, 2021 | 6-8 pm, c.t. | ZOOM link

Frantz Fanon famously argued (1967) that colonialism was marked by an unprecedented use of violence on the minds and bodies of the colonised people. Postcolonial societies have further witnessed widespread violence and trauma in the long-term ethnic conflicts and civil wars from the 1950s and 60s onward, until today. Because of the deliberate, often state- sponsored, killing of civilians/citizens, raping of women and children, and blockade of resources leading to famines and diseases, social scientists have defined these violent events as genocides (Horowitz 1976; Fein 1990; Katz 1994; Valentino 2007). Postcolonial literatures and arts have urgently represented these genocides to mobilise the immediate politico-moral sentiment for international humanitarianism and the long-term social-biological question of multigenerational trauma (Norridge 2011; Heerten and Moses 2014). Postcolonial literary studies, however, has been shy of a sustained engagement with this topic (Lazarus 2011; Barnard et al 2015). In this presentation, I will first establish the link between postcolonialism, civil war and genocide, and then show how postcolonial literature and arts have used the category of genocide to suggest an elongated political temporality of 20thC colonial/fascist violence. Here, my main entry point is the 1971 Bangladesh war of liberation. I will argue through Zahir Raihan’s short film, Stop Genocide: 1971 (1971) and Shaidul Jahir’s novella, Jibon o Rajnoitik Bastobota (Life and Political Reality, 1988) that the concept of genocide has been key to not only imagining the traumatised birth of the postcolonial nation but also thinking through the complex question of living with citizen “traitors” in a secular, people’s republic.

Sourit Bhattacharya is Lecturer in Postcolonial Studies at the University of Glasgow. His research interests include postcolonial literatures; disaster studies; food and famine studies; and materialist literary criticism. His first monograph, Postcolonial Modernity and the Indian Novel: On Catastrophic Realism was published by Palgrave in 2020. His co-edited volume on the left radical Bengali writer, Nabarun Bhattacharya (Bloomsbury) also came out in the same year. He is currently writing his second monograph tentatively titled Postcolonialism Now (Orient BlackSwan), which this presentation is a part of. Sourit is a founding co-editor of Sanglap: Journal of Literary and Cultural Inquiry.

Posted by Moving Cultures-Team in Events, General
Load more